How Do I Do “That” When I’m Pregnant?

Pregnancy Myths-Chispa MagazineIt goes without saying that when us ladies get pregnant, our lives change pretty drastically. Your focus shifts, your hormones shift, and your priorities shift. While the big life changes are often covered by your doctor, magazines, and your friends and family—there are a number of everyday things that change that often isn’t spoken about. What about getting your hair colored, going to the dentist or exercising?

When you become pregnant, it’s often really difficult to adjust to this and to know what you can get on with as normal and what you need to change.

So, here’s a few things that you can still do when you are with child, and how…

Time for a trim. Swollen ankles, stretch marks, an itchy belly…some things are inevitable when you’re pregnant. But roots and grays? Not necessarily. While it may not be at the top of your list of priorities anymore, a fresh visit to the hairdresser makes everyone feel that bit better, but many women think that for some reason they can’t get their hair colored if they’re pregnant, which simply isn’t the case! However, you should think about waiting until around the beginning of the second trimester.

While after about four weeks pregnant you may have roots creeping through, the first 12 weeks are a time of major development for your baby. Even though you don’t absorb much of the chemicals in hair dye (and there’s actually no hard evidence that those chemicals are indeed harmful to your baby), it’s not worth taking the chance at the chance.

So, book yourself in for a fresh cut ‘n’ color to celebrate reaching that three month mark!

Going to the Dentist? This is another part of pregnancy women worry about, but going to see your dentist during pregnancy is not only safe, but it is recommended to keep you and baby healthy. Having a baby changes  your whole body—including your teeth.

The swelling that you see around your ankles and feet  can also happen in areas you may not see, like your your gums. This can lead to pockets below your gums where bacteria can hide and multiply causing pain and infection.

It’s a good idea to visit your dentist more often than you typically would your during pregnancy, or see your dental hygienist to help you to keep your teeth clean and prevent infection.

Traveling? So many women think that falling pregnant means canceling any vacation plans they have booked—another massive myth. You can, in fact travel for most of your pregnancy, but the middle trimester is best time  to go.

In the first 12 weeks you could potentially feel more tired and sick, and the risk of miscarriage is a little higher. While in the last few weeks when you’re more likely to go into labor, it’s more sensible and safe to stay close to home.

It is however fine to fly at any time during a pregnancy is terms of affecting the health of your baby, but you should discuss it with your midwife before you go. Also, many airline won’t let you fly in the last few weeks. So check out their policy before you book. Even at 28 weeks, some ask for a letter confirming your due date and confirming you aren’t at risk of complications.

Exercising? So many women are fearful of exercising when they get pregnant, worried that they could harm their baby. The opposite is in fact true, and doing daily exercise may even help to prevent complications in your pregnancy such as pre-eclampsia. It can also help you to have a shorter labor and increase your chances of giving birth vaginally.

With this said, it’s important not to push yourself too much. Exercises like walking, swimming, aqua-natal classes and cycling on a stationary exercise bike, are all good, safe forms of exercise. Pregnancy yoga and Pilates are also good for strengthening and toning—and relaxing—during pregnancy. Sports to avoid include any that may cause you to fall or be thrown off-balance, like horse-riding, skiing, gymnastics, water skiing or skating should be avoided, for obvious reasons. But pregnancy should never be a reason for you stop being fit and healthy!

Being pregnant will change your life, but it shouldn’t totally change it! There are so many myths out there about what you can and can’t do when you’re expecting. If you’re ever truly at a loss, it’s best to give your doctor or midwife a quick call and check. Oh, and congratulations!

Photo by Bich Ngoc

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Beth Pembrook

Beth Pembrook

Bethany Pembrook is a freelance researcher and writer for a number of online publications. She covers a wide range of topics but works chiefly within the lifestyle, health and beauty sectors as both a researcher and content producer. In her free time, she is an avid runner and cyclist, but she also loves settling down with a good book and heading out with friends for a cocktail or two.
Beth Pembrook

Latest posts by Beth Pembrook (see all)

Beth Pembrook

Bethany Pembrook is a freelance researcher and writer for a number of online publications. She covers a wide range of topics but works chiefly within the lifestyle, health and beauty sectors as both a researcher and content producer. In her free time, she is an avid runner and cyclist, but she also loves settling down with a good book and heading out with friends for a cocktail or two.